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These are all Foo/Pokey dog breeds on Foopets. It also says what they are like in RL.

  • Mastiff-The English Mastiff, referred to by most Kennel Clubs simply as the Mastiff, is a breed of large dog perhaps descended from the ancient Alaunt through the Pugnaces Britanniae. Distinguishable by enormous size, massive head, and a limited range of colors, but always displaying a black mask, the Mastiff is noted for its gentle temperament. The lineage of modern dogs can be traced back to the early 19th century, and the modern type was stabilised in the 1880s. Following a period of sharp decline, the Mastiff has increased its worldwide popularity.
  • Boston Terrier-Truly an "All-American" dog, the Boston Terrier is a lively and highly intelligent breed with an excellent disposition. Conveying an impression of determination, strength and activity, he is short-headed and compactly built, and must be black, brindle or seal with white markings.
  • German Shepherd-The German Shepherd Dog is hailed as the world’s leading police, guard and military dog, however, this dependable breed is more than its 9-to-5 job. Consistently one of the United States’ most popular breeds according to AKC® Registration Statistics, the German Shepherd Dog is also a loving family companion, herder and show competitor. The breed is approachable, direct and fearless, with a strong, muscular body. The GSD may be most colors, but most commonly is black and tan.
  • Boxer-The well-conditioned middleweight athlete of dogdom, the Boxer is a powerful dog with an intelligent and alert expression. While they are instinctive guardians, the Boxer loves to be with his people. This personality has allowed them to succeed as couriers during war time and as seeing-eye dogs for the blind. Appearing in both fawn and brindle colors, the Boxer currently ranks as one of the most popular dogs in the United States according to AKC® Registration Statistics.
  • Jack Russell (Smooth & rough Coat)-The Jack Russell terrier is a small terrier that has its origins in fox hunting. It is principally white-bodied smooth, rough or broken-coated which is commonly confused with the Parson Russell terrier (the American Kennel Club (AKC) and affiliate variant) and the Russell terrier (a shorter legged, stockier variety, whose name within the Fédération Cynologique Internationale is "Jack Russell terrier"), with the term "Jack Russell" commonly misapplied to other small white terriers. The Jack Russell is a broad type, with a size range of 10–15 inches (25–38 cm), the Parson Russell is limited only to a middle range with a standard size of 12–14 inches (30–36 cm), while the Russell terrier is smaller at 8–12 inches (20–30 cm), however each breed has different physical proportions according to the standards of their breed clubs.
  • Golden Retriever-The Golden Retriever is a medium-sized breed of dog. They were historically developed as gundogs to retrieve shot waterfowl such as ducks and upland game birds during hunting and shooting parties.[1] They were named retriever because of their ability to retrieve game undamaged. Golden retrievers have an instinctive love of water. They have a dense inner coat that provides them with adequate warmth and a water repellent outer coat that lies flat against their body. These dogs are well suited to suburban or country environments. Although they need substantial outdoor exercise, they should be kept in a fenced area because of their instincts as hunting dogs and tendency to roam
  • Pitbull-The term Pit Bull is used in reference to multiple breeds of dogs. Namely, the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier and Staffordshire Bull Terrier, as well as any crosses between the three. However, in a few parts of the world the American Bulldog is also classified as 'Pit Bull' type dog, despite the fact that they have major genetic differences. In the 90's, the American Bully was created from the American Staffordshire Terrier and the American Pit Bull Terrier.
  • Westie-The West Highland White Terrier, commonly known as the Westie, is a Scottish breed of dog with a distinctive white coat. The modern breed is descended from a number of breeding programes of white terriers in Scotland prior to the 20th century. Edward Donald Malcolm, 16th Laird of Poltalloch, is credited with the creation of the modern breed from his Poltalloch Terrier, but did not want to be known as such. Other related breeds included George Campbell, 8th Duke of Argyll's Roseneath Terrier and Dr. Americ Edwin Flaxman's Pittenweem Terriers. The breeds of small white Scottish terriers were given its modern name for the first time in 1908, with recognition by major kennel clubs occurring around the same time. The breed remains popular in the UK and is in the top third of all breeds in the USA since the 1960s. It has been featured in television and film including in Hamish Macbeth and in advertising by companies such as Cesar dog food and Scottish whisky Black & White.
  • Great Dane-The Great Dane (18th Cent. French: Grand Danois), also known as German Mastiff (German: Deutsche Dogge) or Danish Hound (German: Dänischer Hund), is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) known for its giant size.[2] The Great Dane is one of the world's tallest dog breeds; the current world record holder, measuring 109 cm (43 in) from paw to shoulder; 220 cm (7.2 ft) from head to tail, is George.[3] Great danes were originally bred to hunt deer and wild boar.
  • Schnauzer-A schnauzer ( /ˈʃnzər/) (German: [ˈʃnaʊtsɐ], plural schnauzer) is a dog breed that originated in Germany in the 15th and 16th centuries.[1] The term comes from the German word for "mustache",[2] because of the dog's distinctively bearded snout. Some authorities, such as Encyclopædia Britannica, also claim that the name is derived from the word's secondary meaning of "moustache".[3] Although the schnauzer is considered a terrier-type dog, they do not have the typical terrier temperament. They seem to be kinder, calmer, less energetic, and easier to train than a dog such as a Scottish terrier would be.[citation needed]
  • Min Pin-The Miniature Pinscher (Zwergpinscher, Min Pin) is a small breed of dog, originating from Germany. The breed's earliest ancestors may have been a mix of Italian Greyhounds and Dachshunds.[1] The international kennel club, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, lists the Miniature Pinscher in Group 2, Section 1.1 Pinscher, along with the Dobermann, the German Pinscher, the Austrian Pinscher, and the other toy pinscher, the Affenpinscher.[2] Other kennel clubs list the Miniature Pinscher in the Toy Group or Companion Group. The Miniature Pinscher is colloquially known as the "King of the Toys"
  • Dachshund-The dachshund (UK /ˈdæksənd/ or US /ˈdɑːkshʊnt/ DAHKS-huunt or US /ˈdɑːksənt/;[2] German: [ˈdaksˌhʊnt]) is a short-legged, long-bodied dog breed belonging to the hound family. The standard size dachshund was bred to scent, chase, and flush out badgers and other burrow-dwelling animals, while the miniature dachshund was developed to hunt smaller prey such as rabbits. In the American West they have also been used to hunt prairie dogs.
  • Weimaraner-The Weimaraner (/ˈvmərɑːnər/VY-mə-rah-nər) is a dog that was originally bred for hunting in the early 19th century. Early Weimaraners were used by royalty for hunting large game such as boar, bear, and deer. As the popularity of large game hunting began to decline, Weimaraners were used for hunting smaller animals like fowl, rabbits, and foxes. Weimaraners are great water dogs as evidenced by their webbed toes.
  • Austraillian Shepherd-The Australian shepherd is a breed of herding dog that was developed on ranches in the western United States.[2] Despite its name, the breed, commonly known as an Aussie, did not originate in Australia and is American.[3] In Australia, a Border Collie or Kelpie is more commonly used to herd sheep. They acquired their name because some of these dogs were used to herd Australian sheep.[4][5] The breed rose gradually in popularity with the boom of western riding after World War I. They became known to the general public through rodeos, horse shows, and through Disney movies made for television.
  • Yorkie Terrier-The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed in the 19th century in the county of Yorkshire, England to catch rats in clothing mills. The defining features of the breed are its size, 3 pounds (1.4 kg) to 7 pounds (3.2 kg), and its silky blue and tan coat. The breed is nicknamed Yorkie and is placed in the Toy Terrier section of the Terrier Group by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale and in the Toy Group or Companion Group by other kennel clubs, although all agree that the breed is a terrier. A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Australian Silky Terrier.
  • Dalmatian-The Dalmatian (Croatian: Dalmatinac, Dalmatiner) is a breed of dog whose roots are often said to trace back to Dalmatia, a region of Croatia where the first illustrations of the dog have been found.[1] The Dalmatian is noted for its unique black- or brown-spotted coat and was mainly used as a carriage dog in its early days. Today, this dog remains a well-loved family pet, and many dog enthusiasts enter their pets into the competitions of many kennel clubs.
  • Portugese Water Dog-The Portuguese Water Dog is a breed of working dog as classified by the American Kennel Club. Portuguese Water Dogs are originally from the Portuguese region of the Algarve, from where the breed expanded to all around Portugal's coast, where they were taught to herd fish into fishermen's nets, to retrieve lost tackle or broken nets, and to act as couriers from ship to ship, or ship to shore. Portuguese Water Dogs rode in bobbing fishing trawlers as they worked their way from the warm Atlantic waters of Portugal to the frigid fishing waters off the coast of Iceland where the fleets caught cod to bring home.[1] Portuguese Water Dogs were often taken with sailors during the Portuguese discoveries.
  • Beagle-The Beagle is a breed of small to medium-sized dog. A member of the Hound Group, it is similar in appearance to the Foxhound, but smaller, with shorter legs and longer, softer ears. Beagles are scent hounds, developed primarily for tracking hare, rabbit, and other game. They have a great sense of smell and tracking instinct that sees them employed as detection dogs for prohibited agricultural imports and foodstuffs in quarantine around the world. Beagles are intelligent, and are popular as pets because of their size, even temper, and lack of inherited health problems. These characteristics also make them the dog of choice for animal testing.
  • Rottweiler-The Rottweiler is a medium to large size breed of domestic dog. The dogs were known as "Rottweil butchers' dogs" (German: Rottweiler Metzgerhund) because they were used to herd livestock and pull carts laden with butchered meat and other products to market.[1] Some records[which?] indicate that earlier Rottweilers may have also been used for hunting, although the modern Rottweiler has a relatively low hunting instinct.
  • Poodle Mix-The Poodle is a breed of dog. The poodle breed is found officially in toy, miniature, and standard sizes, with many coat colors. Originally bred as a type of water dog, the Poodle is skillful in many dog sports, including agility, obedience, tracking, and even herding. Poodles have taken top honors in many conformation shows, including "Best in Show" at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1991 and 2002, and at the World Dog Show in 2007 and 2010.
  • Bulldog-Bulldog is the name for a breed of dog commonly referred to as the English Bulldog. Other Bulldog breeds include the American Bulldog, Olde English Bulldogge, Australian Bulldog and the French Bulldog. The Bulldog is a muscular heavy dog with a wrinkled face and a distinctive pushed-in nose. The American Kennel Club (AKC), The Kennel Club (UK) and the United Kennel Club (UKC) oversee breeding standards.
  • Husky-

Husky is a general name for a type of dog used to pull sleds in northern regions, differentiated from other sled dog types by their fast pulling style.[1] They are "an ever-changing cross-breed of the...fastest dogs".[2] The Alaskan Malamute, by contrast, is "the largest and most powerful" sled dog,[3] and was used for heavier loads. Huskies are used in sled dog racing. In recent years companies have been marketing tourist treks with dog sleds for adventure travelers in snow regions as well.[4] Huskies are also today kept as pets, and groups work to find new pet homes for retired racing and adventure trekking dogs

  • Pug-The pug is a toy dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face, and curled tail. The breed has a fine, glossy coat that comes in a variety of colors, and a compact square body with well-developed muscle. They have been described as multum in parvo ("much in little"), referring to the pug's personality and small size. Known in ancient China as lo-sze, they may have been responsible for the English Bulldog, the modern Pekingese and King Charles spaniel. They have Chinese origins, but were popularized in Western Europe by the House of Orange of the Netherlands and the House of Stuart of England, Ireland and Scotland.[2]
  • Shiba Inu-The Shiba Inu (柴犬?) is the smallest of the six original and distinct breeds of dog from Japan.[1]
  • Marley Lab
  • Chihuaua
  • Yellow Lab Mix
  • Chocolate Lab Mix
  • Black Lab Mix
  • Pokey Husky
  • Pokey German Shepherd
  • Pokey Rottweiler
  • Pokey Yellow Lab
  • Pokey Chocolate Lab
  • Pokey Black Lab
  • Pokey Chihuahua
  • Pokey Yorkie
  • Red Husky
  • Chinese Crested

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